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Clinton Power Station Again Supports DeWitt County's Write Stuff for Kids Program

Exelon Nuclear’s Clinton Power Station is once again helping to provide school supplies to needy DeWitt County children, applying financial and human resources to support the Write Stuff for Kids program.

 

 Clinton, IL - Exelon Nuclear's Clinton Power Station is once again helping to provide school supplies to needy DeWitt County children, applying financial and human resources to support the Write Stuff for Kids program.
The Clinton Power Station recently made a $3,000 contribution to the organization. In addition, plant employees will collect and fill backpacks with school supplies and donate them so kids can start the school year fully equipped. Exelon Nuclear has been a major supporter of Write Stuff for Kids for nearly a decade.
"Over the last nine years we have been able to provide more than 6,500 students with school supplies," said Kathleen Frick, Director, Write Stuff for Kids. "We are extremely fortunate to have Exelon Nuclear and the Clinton Power Station support us in such a caring and giving way."
Write Stuff For Kids, Inc. is a non-profit organization that provides school supplies to DeWitt County children in need. In 2010, a group of Clinton Power Station interns led the station's effort to provide backpacks full of supplies for 52 third and fourth grade students. In all, some 75 students received school supplies and assistance with school registration fees, through the organization. Because of the economic downturn, even more support is needed this year.
"We're proud of our continued support for great programs like Write Stuff for Kids, which makes a real difference in kids' lives by ensuring they have the supplies they need to succeed in school," said Keith Taber, Clinton Power Station plant manager. "It's part of Exelon Nuclear's commitment to being a good corporate citizen."
Clinton Power Station is located approximately six miles east of Clinton, Ill. At full power, the station produces approximately 1,065 net megawatts of carbon-free electricity.

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